Are you feeling the heat and dealing with low energy or brain fog on a daily basis? If so, I have a few ideas to power you up!
Make H2O your best friend. Research says even 1-2% water loss impacts mental acuity. The most impactful way to combat brain fog is to HYDRATE! If hydration isn’t optimal, the pace at which nutrients get to our cells slow down causing low energy and mental fuzzies.
Hydrate with other sources, too. While bodies and needs may vary, a good rule of thumb is half your weight in ounces of water each day. Fruits & vegetables are also mostly made up of water, so strive to get in your recommended 9-11 servings each day as well.   
Eat fat. This is one of my personal favorites. Blood sugar level can have a big impact on how our bodies function and feel during the day.  Eating poorly can cause a vicious cycle of energy and mood crashes and cravings due to refined and heavily processed carbs. An easy way to combat this is to eat fat b/c it has little impact on blood sugar. Nuts or a piece of cheese make better snack choices & they don’t require preparation.
Take standing breaks. We are such a sedentary society! Seriously, sitting is the new “smoking” due to the health detriment it causes. Our bodies were meant to MOVE. Make a point to stand up for 10 minutes several times a day to increase blood pressure and get blood/O2 flowing. 
Move (& move outside). One of the simplest cure-alls around, is exercising to give you a boost. Plus, if you take it outside, Vitamin D is the sun itself. Morning or during lunch will energize you. Just 20 minutes will supply your daily need of Vitamin D. I recently started wearing a Garmin Vivofit & I have to tell you, there are days my butt doesn’t leave the office chair! But, seeing the “red line” encourages me to take a few laps around the atrium if I can’t get outside at lunch.
Embrace the power of the nap. It’s no secret that a lot of folks struggle with enough quality sleep. A nap can be a great way to offer respite to all that’s overtaxed and reinvigorate your energy. If your workday doesn’t allow the opportunity, try to take time for a legit break by reading a book, going for a short stroll or talking to a friend.
Assessing your sleep routine can also be a great starting point and long-term strategy to help improve your health. Think and assess your actual bedroom. Is there too much blue light at night? How is the comfort of your bed? Do you have a normal bedtime? Figure out what is optimal for you and make it a priority.
Along those lines, limit evening technology. Artificial light via computer monitors, TVs and phones increases stress hormones. #fact Implement a “no phone” rule before bed. You’ll be more relaxed and fall asleep sooner.
Try essential oils. There’s a reason that people have regularly used essential oils for purposes of health and well-being. Try inhaling peppermint to reduce burnout. It is pleasant smell to breathe in, but you can also try applying it to the back of your neck and shoulders to help support your energy over a longer stretch of time. Try peppermint vs drinking coffee.
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Meditate. Today’s craziness of multi-tasking, long hours, and too-full agendas can leave us tired & gaining weight. Even thinking about managing stress can seem like a big task in and itself. Studies show, however, that simply taking a few seconds to breathe and close your eyes can lower cortisol. There are a lot of neat apps out there now to help with just that. Try a few and make it a practice to take 5 at least once a day.
Try a few of these ideas and let me know how they work for you. 
As my friend Sharon used to say, “What have you got to GAIN?”  Until next time, choose fit, live STRONG, and breathe. 
Lisa
Recent neuroscience studies have proven that what we eat and how we live can have huge impacts on our brains. Neurogenesis, or the process of making new brain cells, is the topic of today’s blog. This is fascinating stuff on so many levels! Old think was that we quit growing brain cells in our 20’s and then we just went downhill from there. In the late ‘90’s, scientists discovered we can actually make new brain cells our entire life. The rate of neurogenesis (brain cell development/growth) is an important biomarker of brain health –which ultimately impacts the quality of our lives, as you can imagine!
 
It makes sense that a low rate of making new brain cells is associated with cognitive decline, anxiety, memory problems, stress/depression and lower immunity.  While on the other hand, people with a high rate of new brain cell growth have cognitive enhancements, faster problem solving, protection against stress/anxiety, etc. Even more interesting is that people can increase the rate of neurogenesis at least 5 times. Holy cow. Now you see how the rate of neurogenesis can have a big impact on the quality of your life? FIVE TIMES!! (Dayam Daniel!)
 
What can we do? Well, first of all, understand that the best results come from multiple ways to create a synergistic effect. An analogy Dr. Cortright uses is that if you want to build a beautiful house, you have to use high quality materials.  Seems simple enough.  In his book, “The Neurogenesis Diet & Lifestyle”, Dr. Cortright tells us what mental activities we can do to increase neurogenesis, along with spiritual things we can do, active things we can do, and of course, DIETARY things we can do.  In a nutshell, the dietary piece is twofold: we want to decrease the things that are neurotoxic because they slow down the rate of brain cell development AND at the same time increase the things that enhance neurogenesis.
 
Here are a few points made in his book:

 

  • Neurotoxins to avoid include bad, unhealthy fats and sugar/carbohydrates. We can thank the government since the 60’s for their recommendations that fail to distinguish good fats from unhealthy, oxidized (trans) fats. When bad fats get into blood stream, it produces a host of problems. The good ol’ outdated food pyramid was heavy on carbohydrates. Don’t’ cook with vegetable oils. Instead cook with coconut oil, butter, or ghee. Avoid eating fried foods. 
  • Include good fats from avocados, nuts, grass fed beef, pastured chicken/eggs, wild caught fish, etc. Omega 3’s fatty acids are the bomb (especially DHA since 1/3 of our brains are made up of this stuff). Taking 4-5 grams a day of omega-3’s that are molecularly distilled (to avoid mercury which is a neurotoxin) is recommended by Dr. Cortright.
  • Green tea (ECGCs) are beneficial, as is
  • Quercetin, and      
  • Ginseng

 

The book is full of more detailed information, as is his website: www.BrantCortright.com. I really can’t do it justice in one blog entry. Just know how important it is to reduce inflammatory responses within the body/bloodstream. Repeated inflammation literally chews up the inside of our blood vessels. Because your brain gets 20% of your blood, when you ingest/expose bad fats/sugar/toxins, that junk literally goes to your head.  Say you eat a burger and fries…the fries supply nasty fat/carbs and the bread supplies additional easily digested carbohydrates. Congrats, you just flooded your bloodstream with one big inflammatory responses. Do that throughout the week/month/year….well you get the picture. A high sugar diet will cut the rate of brain cell building in HALF. Scientists have tracked cognitive decline directly with sugar intake and alzheimers is now dubbed Type 3 Diabetes.  Things that make you go, hmm..!
 
Today, about 80% of the American population has some degree of glucose intolerance, meaning they have higher levels of insulin than is healthy, creating toxicity in every organ of the body. Accelerated aging, or glycation, begins to occur whenever sugar/glucose enters the body. So yeah, I’m sitting here thinking about the handful of peanut M&M’s I grabbed off an associate’s desk last week!  (Sidebar: a blood test called a “hemoglobin A1C” can show the levels of glucose from the past 3 months.)  High fructose is a nasty culprit in a lot of foods.
 
But, I digress. There’s so much good information in this book!  I’d like to share his information regarding antidepressants, as well. But, that’s a dialogue for another day.
 
To wrap this up, here are the take-aways:

 

  • A high sugar diet will cut the rate of brain cell building IN HALF. We live in such a neurotoxic world and most of our brains are functioning well below what is possible. With our bodies lasting longer, why kill brain cells when we can enhance cognitive development so we don’t become a statistic? Right now, 1 in 3 Americans develop Alzheimer’s or some form of dementia.
  • We can enhance brain cell building FIVE times, maybe more, with the right activities (dietary, movement, spiritual).
  • Read the book.

 

What have you got to gain? Just cognitive enhancement, mood elevation and an enhanced quality of life!
Until next time, choose fit, laugh often, reduce sugar, & add omega-3’s.
 
~Lisa
 
There are two questions I ask about when people inquire about getting in shape or losing weight.
“Are you drinking enough water and staying hydrated?”
“Are you getting enough quality sleep?”
Sleep is vital in so many ways (see blog on sleep), but as we get older, we tend to assume we can get by on less– while at the same time falling asleep and staying asleep become challenges.  Those blue screens from our TVs, iPads, electronic readers and phones are wreaking havoc with falling asleep for young and old. To help you look good, feel good, and maintain good weight and hormone levels, try these steps to increase the likelihood of getting a good night’s sleep, EVERY night.
1. Try to keep a consistent sleep routine. This means going to bed at the same time each night and wake up at the same time each morning. Keeping the “status quo” routine will train you to fall asleep more easily and wake up more refreshed.
2. No TV or electronic media use in bed! Use the bed only for sleep and sex.  Try to keep the bed for sleep ‘n sex! Also, improve your sleep surroundings so electronics are OFF and the environment is quiet, dark and free of clutter.
3. Watch the timing on caffeine intake, especially after 2:00 PM. Even a single cup of coffee or tea in the morning means a sleepless night for some folks.
4. MOVE!  Getting physical especially with walking, running, or swimming provides three important sleep benefits like falling asleep faster, achieving a higher % of restorative deep sleep, and staying asleep during the night. Watch the time you work out, however, because exercising too late causes physiological changes that might interfere with your sleep.
5. Avoid excessive napping. Plain and simple, long naps can disrupt your natural sleep cycle. A short nap can be wonderful, but sleeping an hour or longer during the day might keep you up at night.
6. If you smoke or chew, now is a good time to STOP. Tobacco & nicotine speed up your heart rate, raise blood pressure, and stimulate fast brainwave activity that keeps you awake.
Along those lines, use alcohol cautiously. I agree a glass of pinot can be relaxing…but, the effects disappear after a few hours and might cause frequent awakenings.
7. Give in. If you are tossing still after 20 minutes in bed, get out of bed and read awhile to help you relax.
8. Check the temp. Keep the bedroom at a constant, comfortable temperature, and avoid getting over heated.
Want to optimize your life? Improve the quality and quantity of your sleep at night. Your sleep schedule, bedtime habits, and day-to-day lifestyle choices can make an enormous difference to your nightly rest. And THAT will help you be more productive, mentally sharp, emotionally balanced, and full of energy all day long.
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Until next time, choose fit. Be happy.  
What have you got to gain?
~Lisa    
 

 

Seriously, it is! Plain and simple: sugar is a toxin. Toxins are poisons that can cause disease in a body.  There is no question that sugar contributes to cancer, heart disease, obesity and diabetes.  Studies estimate that Americans consume more than 150 pounds of this sh– in a year. Holy cow! It’s no wonder that the rate of diseases have increased. Would you believe sugar kills more people than cocaine or heroin?  Whatcha think about that, Willis?

Here’s the skinny: not only is sugar “candy for cancer cells” but it also causes inflammation in the body and speeds up aging (gulp). Lower your sugar intake and you improve your health in a multitude of ways.

So how does one take on this aspect of health improvement?

The first step is to become aware of your sugar intake. It is coming to us in various forms: sodas, juices, energy bars, ketchup or marinades, and easily digested processed foods. So unless you are looking to age quickly, put on weight or get sick, then 2016 is a GREAT time to eliminate and/or reduce added sugars in your diet AND the diets of those you love. Become aware and read your labels.

Next, consider ways you can reduce your sugar intake. Write down your ideas— any that come to mind! Maybe it’s one margarita vs. two. Maybe it’s one margarita a month vs. weekly. Maybe it’s no alcohol or sodas at all. Maybe it’s drinking your tea without sugar/honey. Consider all your options and choose some to do right away! Small changes done incrementally and consistently over time will yield big results. Become aware, make a list of ways to reduce sugar, then track it.

Keep a log of your sugar intake. Do you know how much you are consuming daily? Weekly? If there is any area of your life you want to improve, then MEASURE IT!   Look at your list of ideas to cut sugar each morning. Being conscious of your desires helps you make smarter choices. Then track your progress and recommit to ideas to improve the next day. Remind yourself of why you are doing this. Rinse and repeat.

Remember, today is “some” day and all progress is good.

Until next time, choose fit, be healthy, and laugh along this crazy, wonderful journey.

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~Lisa

Are you a little concerned that your good work to date will get derailed this holiday season? Don’t despair, healthy living does not mean total deprivation. It does, however, require a few strategies to keep you on the right track.  Here are a few ways you can limit temptations over the holidays:
  1. Drink up. (Water…that is!) You’d be surprised at the difference dehydration can make. It’s often mistaken for hunger. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
  2. Out of sight, out of mind.  You know how there’s a reason for product placement at the grocery store? Do your own “marketing” at home by removing food or snacks not healthy for your family. Out of sight, out of mind.
  3. Keep a log so you can identify triggers and are realistic about input/output. Most folks overestimate calories burned and underestimate calories consumed. Keep it real.
  4. Know your limit. Can you indulge a little? Or does one bit turn into the entire bag/box? If the latter is the case, then that means no sugar should pass your lips. So be it. Is it difficult to eat out if you see or smell dessert or French fries? If so, skip it for now. Honor thyself. If you CAN indulge a little, go for it. Enjoy it, savor it, and then add some extra workout time. It’s all good.
  5. Good fats help resist the sugar urge. As does protein. Eat up.
  6. Create a bit of crazy. Visualization, that is. If sugar is still tempting you, imagine your sugar free life and the healthy/energetic/lean self you’ll be sporting! SEE it, claim it, then make the choice that aligns with that vision.
  7. Change your habits…or people around you. We talked about this one before. If you eat mindlessly while watching TV, don’t let yourself watch TV unless you are on the elliptical. Or, avoid that “friend” who eats junk food in front of you daily while you nurture your self goals.
  8. Lead the way. Influence your friends and be the change you want to be. Cook healthy, commit to exercise. Healthy habits beget other healthy habits.
  9. Commit publically. With your friends, family, online. Ask to be held accountable. It works!
  10. Take a nap! This is a goal every weekend (for me). It doesn’t always occur, but when it does, it’s soooo sweet! I find I want sugar when I’m tired. Not to mention I get a little bit grumpy when I’m in need of more zzzz’s.
Last, it’s not about being perfect, but choosing to make better decisions, more frequently, and more consistently over time. Becoming healthier is a journey.  And tomorrow always brings a new day.    That’s awesome.  So next time you are faced with that fork in the road, ask yourself, “What have I got to gain?”
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Until next time, choose fit, be strong. And, laugh often.
~Lisa
 
The last time we chatted, we talked about the pros/cons and influences of our environment and the people we hang out with. To help secure success, here are five things to do to make good things happen in your life.
 
1. ADMIT THAT ….” –IT” HAPPENS
Because we are faced with loads of data and information daily, we simply can’t evaluate each & every choice, therefore much that happens is automatic (efficient) behavior patterns and habits. When we are in uncertain environments we tend to “follow the herd”, so the key is to plan ahead, especially when traveling. Scope out the nearest gym or track and pack snacks.  BE the change and you may influence your companions to mimic your healthy behavior.
 
 2. KNOW YOUR TRADEOFFS/ LIMITS
Pay attention to your food intake and avoid mindless eating. Have a set of guidelines that you will follow in all situations so it eventually becomes a habit. (Like, veggies only during happy hour free for alls laden with fake cheese and fried options.) Maybe you have a rule that you will put your fork down between bites. Or, maybe you will only watch TV if doing so on the elliptical or doing exercises during commercials to avoid sitting and being sedentary. This is actually one of my favorite ways to slip in workouts. For normal TV viewers (yes, I am one of those), there’s at least 20 minutes during a 60 minute show. Do you know how many squats, jumping jacks, and crunches you can do? I like to do 30 second circuits repeating exercises until the next commercial, at which time I switch to another circuit of exercises (squats, dips, push-ups, knee outs).
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3. BUILD-A-BUDDY (WORKOUT GROUP, THAT IS)
One of the best ways to protect your fitness routine   is to invite the friends of your friends to work out and build a wall of influence that increases your chance of sticking to a workout program. Shhhhwwwwingggg! 
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4. IF YOU’R HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT
Avoid your Debbie downer friends. (Remember that SNL skit where the girl always put a negative spin on EVERYthing?) Yeah, stay away from those folks and hang with the happy ones. It’s contagious and it works both ways. And smile. It reinforces a positive mood. Practice daily gratitude daily by writing down 3 things you are thankful for, say thanks, and tell your loved ones how  much you appreciate them. Research shows regular gratitude practice creates new neural pathways that support a more positive outlook. WOW, that’s powerful, isn’t it? Even better is that others are more likely to “catch” your positive feelings over your negative ones. Be a P.O.P.V. or a “proliferator of positive vibes”.  It’s seriously catching.
                                                        Happy (Official YouTube Video by Pharrell Williams)
 
5. TAP INTO YOUR NEO-CORTEX
To help you choose the right (healthy) action, try being intentional using body scanning and labeling. Do a quick check-in with sensations and then label your emotional state by noting “this is just fear” or “this feeling is approval seeking” to kick your neo-cortex into action. This practice allows you to shift from being reactive and move to a calmer state of awareness. 
 
Doable, right?  Try my “five” to enhance “alive”.  And commit to fit.
 
What have you got to lose?
 
 
Sounds a little hard core, eh? Hear me out…
My last blog post talked about our social environment and the positive or negative influences that we face. The two professors responsible for this research about the power of our social networks made clear is that our abilities to resist negative influences and to gain positive ones aren’t without limits.  (Btw, Christakis and Fowler are the two professors with this fascinating work. You can follow them @connected_book on Twitter.)
 
So…what does that mean, exactly? Well, it means there might be times when saying “buh-bye” to certain friends or social contacts is the healthier choice. What’s that you say? #yesshesaidthat…especially if you are challenged with an addiction, OR…if you know that a certain relationship is having a pronounced negative effect on your health, happiness or personal growth.
 
In situations like those, cutting loose of heavy anchors and freeing yourself to develop healthier circles of support may be an important step in staying true to your own positive trajectory. (Beam me up, Scotty!)
 
In most cases, however, the positive or negative impact of our social relationships isn’t quite so cut and dried. I’m a pizza lover—oh, please don’t ditch me! But…maybe you should for a while if being with me is a trigger for unhealthy actions, you know? You may also have social contacts you don’t really choose — like sedentary coworkers or negative-minded extended family and in-laws.
 
While some in your circle may pose a challenge to your health intentions, such less-than-perfect social contacts aren’t cause to be concerned. You see, Christakis and Fowler believe that the broader and more varied your social network, the greater its potential benefits for both health and happiness. The reason is that although we tend to attribute our happiness to our closest, most significant relationships, research shows that it’s also fed by regular exposure to small moments of pleasure, novelty and joy — things we stand a better chance of experiencing when we are socially connected and supported by more than just one or two other individuals.
 
Wow, that’s huge. Small moments of pleasure. Novelty. Joy.
 
What’s a girl (or guy) to do?  Work on these three skills:

 

  • Learn to recognize when your behavior is being negatively shaped. (a journal can help here)
  • Develop the ability to deliberately make better choices under pressure.
  • Engage in opportunities to gently nudge your network in healthier directions.

 

This way, you can achieve a Win/Win: Reap the fullest possible benefits of your social network AND avoid its pitfalls.  And perhaps I should add a “4th” skill: identify what brings you joy and make sure you build those experiences into your days and weeks. Doing these four things require awareness, intention, and commitment for a healthy life.  Remember, “some” day is today. And tomorrow always provides a second chance.
 
That’s awesome.
 
Until next time, live fit, choose health. And be happy.
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By now, you’ve seen and heard plenty about the impact of your social environment and how you can catch obesity and other unhealthy habits from your friends and fam.  The half full cup view on this is true, too. You can “catch” good health and fitness, as well.  Turns out you can reap benefits whether your social network is in close physical proximity or virtual. Cool, huh? 
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Do you remember the professors several years back who spread the word about the quality of your social sphere on health?  If your network has bad habits (eating, drinking, little sleep, excessive TV/gaming, overweight or smoking)…chances are you have those same habits.
If you have a second, check the studies out. Compelling stuff.  
 
 
So… unhealthy behavior is quite communicable. According to the studies, your chance of becoming obese increases:

 

  • 57 % when one of your friends is obese
  • 40 % chance if it’s one of your siblings, and
  • 37 % if it’s your spouse.  

But hey, before you start looking around…remember the flip side. Because health and behavior are linked so closely, that means that any health state connected to habitual behaviors is communicable. (Big sigh, right?!)  Even more good news: social connections can also improve your health. Think about how effective support groups are, right?  People who hang around others who think positively also tend to think positively. You can lose weight, gain energy, and get fit together just as easily.

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Those closest to us have the most impact, but even a distant contact can have a nice impact. 
 
Now, before you go ditching those less than perfect around you, remember having friends (al Beit even the unhealthy ones) will still add happiness and longevity to your life.  In that case, why don’t YOU have a positive impact on them?  Your fitness and health decisions will have the ripple effect through your whole social circle, eventually coming right back to you in the form of increased social support.  I have to smile when my college son teases me and buys gluten free products because information I’ve shared over the years sunk in. (Yay) When he was taking nutrition, he said it was a breeze because he’d picked up so much information through osmosis. I <heart> that.
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Next time you’re digging deep for a reason to go to the gym, or  or pack a lunch instead of hitting the drive-thru, this may be a perspective to consider. Even if you’re not hugely motivated to make a healthy choice for yourself, you may be a little more willing to do it for the sake of the people you care about — or even for those you don’t know. According to the studies, your actions are influencing 1000 people. That’s huge. Take charge of your health and improve the world one healthy habit at a time.
 
To my fit friends who inspire or motivate me to eat clean, run, lift, train harder, or get to bed sooner: THANK you. You guys are the BOMB!
 
Choose fit. Laugh often, be contagious.
 
~Lisa
 

 

Good morning friends, I have some good news…and some bad. Shall we hit the bad news first?  OK, here goes: There is no, definitive one-size-fits-all diet, workout, or magic supplement. That’s not too tragic, though, is it? Now for the good news: there are general principles, habits, foods, workouts, and supplements that when performed/eaten/done consistently will yield weight loss, improved health and energy.  In a nutshell, the list condensed below is where “it” is at. (“It” being the recipe for weight loss and improved health success.)
  • MOVE your body. As much as you can, as often as you can, in the manner that suits you most. We talked about sitting being the new “smoking” hazard, so get moving– as often and frequently as possible.
  • Don’t drink your calories. A fifth of what we consume (calorie wise) comes from beverages…and most are loaded with sugar and empty calories. (And yes, I am also talking about alcoholic beverages.)  Cut back! Unless of course, your “beverage” is whey protein shake—which is great post workout or as a meal replacement, in a pinch.
  • Get more sleep. Sounds easy, right? The reality is we trick ourselves into thinking we don’t need more sleep because we can survive on less. We don’t THRIVE on less, however, and performance and mental tests tells us otherwise. Sleep aids recovery, balances hormones, helps with weight loss, improves mood and more.
  • Watch “portion distortion”. Counting calories may not be your thing, but phone apps sure make it easy. What we have learned is that most people underestimate caloric intake and overestimate energy expenditure. Plus, most restaurants provide inflated serving sizes. Split a meal with a friend or take half home. Don’t be fooled by correlating empty, excessive calories as “value”.
  • Cheat foods are ok. Alright, even saying “cheat” or labeling foods as “good” or “bad” is not really a good thing to do. Consider colorful, real foods vs. processed, but instead of striving for perfection, strive for “good enough”. Or, try what I refer to as the “Catholic school girl diet”: eat like an angel 6 days a week and on the 7th day, make the devil blush! In other words, it’s ok to indulge a little. Just don’t let it derail you and keep it as an exception and not the rule. Remember, consistency is king.
  • Go heavy. Lifting weights, that is. Sorry ladies, you will NOT build huge muscles. And regardless of your age, everyone needs to lift heavy and combat muscle decline. Decreasing muscle mass equates to body fat increases AND a slower metabolism. Lift heavy and fire up your metabolically active tissue. NOW.
  • Variety is the spice of life. Mix up your workouts and you’ll get more out of them.
  • Find like-minded peeps. Community is important and like-minded people provide motivation, mentoring and help keep you accountable. I feel so fortunate for the fitness friends I’ve trained & learned from over the years.

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  • Adkins really did have it right. I’m not advocating a specific diet. Honestly, the best plan out there was laid out in the Old Testament. Real food, plain and simple. BUT, if you integrate a practice of carb swapping knocking out pastas and breads, it’s one of the easier ways to help you lose weight as many folks are sensitive to carbs. My fiancé and I are all over cauliflower options in lieu of pasta, potatoes, or bread. (Check out the recipe section of my blog for ideas.)
  • And about that Adkins….eat more fat. Yes, she said that. As much as 35% of your daily calories can be a mix of nuts, avocados, or healthy oils. It’s the TRANS fats you want to avoid like the plague.
  • You really can work out anywhere. Your body can provide great workouts. A jump rope is $10. Squat, climb stairs, step up, jump rope, do jumping jacks or push ups (from knees or feet), etc. A gym is not required.
  • Multi-function exercises work your body better and can aid fat loss. Consider a dumbbell squat to should press. Or, a deadlift to back row.
  • Regarding food, adding solid protein at each meal or snack will help keep you full and keep your metabolism going.
  • Hydrate. Dehydration can make you think you are hungry, impede performance, and affect your mood (plus a whole lot of other things). Water or tea help control your appetite and tea has so many wonderful benefits (see earlier blog). Drink water, drink tea, try some of the drinks I shared in my past blog, but HYDRATE, often.
Last of all, be kind to yourself. YOU are amazing and wonderful. And far from perfect. This is a journey we make together. Laugh at your mistakes and keep trying. YOU are worth it.
 Besides, “what have you got to GAIN”?
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(My earliest health & fitness mentor, Sharon Turrentine, used to ask this Q and it’s a great one. I met her when I was 19 and she was 39 and training for a body building contest. She looked amazing then AND still looks amazing today. A true testament to a healthy living lifestyle. Many thanks, my friend!  You have influenced my life in such a positive way.)
Until next time time, live fit, choose healthy, laugh often.
Lisa

 

On a hot summer day… or, after a good workout…or heck, BEFORE a good workout, you might turn to some form of hydration. After a lot of searching, I’ve landed on a few favorites I thought I’d share.  They are tasty, clean and quite simply, I love them.  So, here they are….#forthecause !
If you are looking for a pre-workout or a little pick me up to slay the day, then try VUKA Energy.  This stuff is the bomb. I tried it first at Lifetime Fitness. If you have been a Red Bull drinker, it’s time to make the ”intelligent energy” drink switch and “go beyond the buzz”. Filled with natural ingredients, no preservatives, and several options to choose from, Vuka Energy has you covered.  My favorite is the zero calorie Berry Lemonade “workout”.  I’ll delve more
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Do you desire a good, clean hydration product with electrolytes and natural sugar (just enough, but not laden with it), and no chemicals, dyes or caffeine? Then checkout Aspire Beverages in several flavors–especially if your kids are into Gatorade (yuck).  Aspire “Storm” is my fave. Make the switch.
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Kombucha that’s a soda?  Yep, you got that right. If you are a Kombucha drinker like me, you won’t mind a little natural sugar in the form of a fermented tasty soda replacement. Live Soda is based out of Austin, Texas and it’s my favorite post kick-butt workout indulgence. I earned it. It’s got good stuff. Live Soda just added a berry flavor, but Culture Cola is my favorite.
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Soda without chemicals, nothing nasty…oh and no calories? If that’s your game, then try one of Uve’s sparkling beverage flavors. This company is new to the cleaner-living-soda game and are off to a great start. They offer several flavors and no sugar.
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Enjoy!