What’s that? Healthspan is the period of life during which a person is healthy and free from disease. It is different from lifespan, which is the total number of years a person lives. A person can have a long lifespan but a short healthspan, or vice versa. I want my healthspan to align with my lifespan, don’t you?   To do this, I’ll focus on these 3 things: strength training, eating healthy, and sleeping well.

So, here’s the thing, as we age, our bodies “can” go through a number of changes. My friends, I’m here to tell you that many age-related declines in health are related to lifestyle decisions…not age. And, one of the most significant changes is a decrease in muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass can lead to a number of problems, including decreased strength, balance, and bone density. In fact, muscle is so important, that it is used to determine not just lifespan and healthspan, but as a metric that unlocks our longevity potential!

To combat potential aging changes, it’s very important to strength train. Strength training helps to build muscle mass and improve bone density. It can also help to improve balance and coordination.

If you’re wondering how to get started, there are a number of different ways to strength train. One popular method is to use weights. Weights can be used to target specific muscle groups or to do full-body workouts. While a gym can provide a variety of options, it’s quite easy to get a great workout from home using your body weight, bands, gliders, or a ball.  Resistance bands are a great option for individuals new to strength training or who have joint pain.

No matter which method you choose, it is important to start slowly and gradually increase the weight or resistance as you get stronger.

In addition to strength training, it is also important to eat a healthy diet. A healthy diet includes plenty of protein, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Limit ultra-processed foods and try to avoid chemicals, dyes, and preservatives AND be aware that “natural flavors” aren’t healthy. Read your labels!

To help your muscle-building efforts on the diet side, protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle mass. Fruits and vegetables are packed with vitamins and minerals that are essential for overall health. Whole grains provide fiber, which can help to keep you feeling full and satisfied.

It is also important to get enough sleep. Sleep is essential for muscle recovery. When you sleep, your body releases hormones that help to repair and rebuild muscle tissue. Most adults need around 7-8 hours of sleep per night. However, some people may need more or less sleep. (see prior post about sleep!)

Finally, it is important to listen to your body and take breaks when you need them. If you are feeling pain, stop the exercise and rest.

While strength training is a great way to stay healthy and fit as you age, below are some additional tips for anyone looking to improve their health and fitness today:

  • Start slowly. If you are new to exercise, start slowly and gradually increase the intensity of your workouts over time.
  • Find an activity that you enjoy. There are many different types of exercise, so find one that you enjoy and that fits into your lifestyle.
  • Set realistic goals. Don’t expect to see results overnight. It takes time and effort to see changes in your body.
  • Be patient. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t see results immediately. Just keep at it, and you will eventually reach your goals.
  • Listen to your body. If you are feeling pain, stop the exercise and rest. Don’t push yourself too hard.
  • Eat a healthy diet. A healthy diet is essential for overall health and fitness. Make sure to eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Get enough sleep. Sleep is essential for muscle recovery and overall health. Most adults need around 7-8 hours of sleep per night.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water throughout the day, especially when you are exercising.
  • Manage stress. Stress can take a toll on your health and fitness. Find healthy ways to manage stress, such as exercise, yoga, or meditation.

Following these tips can help you stay healthy and fit as you age.

As my friend Sharon likes to ask, “What have you got to GAIN?”

To read more:

The Best Anti-Aging Secrets Aren’t So Secret

Avoid These Seed oils (PUFAs) & Why

The Fountain of Youth (Lifting!)

Have you started a workout program only to have it derailed when life gets busy or tough?  Friends, I’m here to tell you: You.Can.Do.This. YOU are strong. See, strength isn’t about being the fastest or running the farthest.  Strength is about showing up for your commitments to yourself consistently & with a positive attitude.

Big, bodacious goals are great. But…did you know there is a LOT of success achieved when reaching 80% of your goals? You see, it’s not about perfection and 100% day in, day out. It’s about the consistency of effort. Consistency is arguably the most important component when working to accomplish goals, in or out of the gym. Without consistency, efforts can be thwarted and forming habits can be more challenging.

If you find yourself struggling to stay on track, check out the strategies below to help with your health and fitness goal success:

Remember your why. Whether you’re prepping for the next competition, trying to get healthy, learning a new skill, or just trying to live life fuller, remember why you are trying to workout. Find your why, write it down, and reference it often!

Something is better than nothing. Have you ever skipped the gym because you couldn’t finish your workout?  It is always better to do something than nothing at all. When you do something, you begin to develop a habit/routine that improves your health.  If you walked instead of working out intensely, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that you did something.

Find an activity you enjoy that keeps your body moving whether it is going on a walk, riding a bike, playing a game of soccer or basketball, practicing handstands (a work in progress for me), or whatever.  Just do it.

The key is not to prioritize your schedule but to schedule your priorities.  Let’s be honest, life can get busy and hectic and crazy. Make taking care of yourself a priority so you can take care of others.   When you have the most energy in the day, so do your best to work out then. Schedule it.  Pay attention when you hear yourself say, “I don’t have time” because what you are really saying is that “It’s not important enough”. Schedule your priorities.

Listen to your body. Follow your body’s cues and modify your workouts accordingly.  Instead of doing your full workout, you can modify weights or the number of sets — or even do some mobility/stretching. Not only is it ok, but it’s also smart to listen to your body and adjust.

Imagine how you will feel after your workout (or a week or month or year)! Our bodies are meant to move and a body in motion stays in motion.  Visualizing the “after” can help.

Find community and accountability. Surround yourself with others who are seeking similar actions. This is huge for me. I am SO grateful to my fitness friends for our mutual motivation & learnings shared over the years.

Create a plan with SMART goals. Write them down, post them where you can see them, and then share them with your friends and family. There are many ways to set goals and track success – experiment and find what works for you. (See my blog posts on goal setting.)

I hope these strategies help you get and stay on track with your workouts!

Remember:

  • No one is perfect
  • Everyone’s “strong” looks different, and
  • Consistency has a bigger impact than anything

Consistency is more powerful than strength and speed and it will take you further than stamina and talent in this journey.

So, you got this. YOU are strong. And yes, you can!

As always, so thankful for your time for reading.

 

Friends, working out can be tough — but it’s a lot easier when you have someone to help you stay motivated. Workout partners can provide support, encouragement, and accountability — all of which can help you reach your fitness goals.

In addition, working out with a partner can make the activity more enjoyable. You can talk and laugh while you work out, which can help you make the time go by faster. You can also push each other to work harder and achieve more. Many of my best friends over the years are women I’ve worked out or run with.

If you don’t have a workout partner, there are many ways to find one. You can ask friends or family members if they would be interested in working out with you. You can also join a fitness class or group, or find a workout buddy online. 

Once you find a workout partner, share your goals and consider setting some together. This will help you stay on track and motivated. You should also communicate with each other regularly to make sure you’re both on the same page.

Working out with a partner can be a great way to improve your fitness and your overall health. If you’re looking to get in shape, consider finding a workout partner to help you reach your goals.  They can help you stay motivated, accountable, and safe. They can also make working out more fun and enjoyable. And…they are cheaper than therapy!!

Find a partner & #buddyup today!

Lisa

As we reflect on 2022 and set new goals for2023, improving personal wellness is often at the top of the list.  To kick off your new year with health improvement success, consider the tips below to integrate better health into your life.

  • Set specific goals.  Take goals like “eating healthier” or “losing weight”, for example.  Instead of a general goal, aim for a specific amount of clean protein per meal, eating 3-5 servings of vegetables or fruit a day, or eliminating processed foods. Instead of “losing weight” strive to lift weights (take a yoga or HITT class, etc.) for 20-30 minutes 3-4 times a week along with walking X times per week for X minutes. Making specific goals can help you stay on track. (See prior post.)  
  • Get good sleep. I have written several blogs about the importance of sleep because it’s SO ESSENTIAL to overall health and well-being. (Check out the most recent post on sleep here.)
  • Establish good stress management routines.  Whether physical or mental, techniques such as meditation, yoga, or deep breathing can help you relax.  Or, consider reorganizing your space to help de-clutter.
  • Make recovery a priority. Seriously. Taking time to rest and repair is as important as your physical activity – especially if you are seeking performance improvements. Try to add a little time to your day (or at the end of your workouts) to roll, stretch, or incorporate some kind of compression or massage therapy and do your body good!
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet. This is an important one for every aspect of performance, training, weight loss, stress management – you name it. You know the drill here: try to reduce or eliminate processed foods & soft drinks (including so called healthy energy drinks) and incorporate a variety of vegetables and clean proteins into your diet.   
  • Hydrate! Did you know being dehydrated negatively impacts mental and physical performance while proper hydration can help reduce fatigue and muscle soreness? Hydration is a super easy place to start. Consider starting your day with a glass of lemon water and counting your glasses of water to ensure proper hydration.
  • Practice gratitude. Rick Warren (A Purpose Driven Life) reminds us that regardless of where we are in life, we always have our feet on two tracks – one of opportunities and blessings… and the other with challenges or problems to solve. Spend time each day purposefully appreciating the positive “track”.

Doing these things will help you start the new year in a positive direction and set yourself up for success. And remember, it’s easier to establish and stick to new habits with a supportive network. Share your goals and surround yourself with like-minded people.

I wish you the BEST of health, happiness & dreams fulfilled.

Cheers & happy 2023!

Lisa

Guys, here’s a sobering fact: Americans are experiencing a shift…life expectancy has begun to decline. I’m talking men AND women. And, not because of genetic changes…but due to our lifestyles — what we eat (or what we don’t eat which can be just as important), what we are exposed to, the quality of our sleep, etc.
 
You might ask, “With so many lifestyle choices, where does one begin?” My humble vote is to start with the gut.  Why? Well, for starters, healthy gut bacteria:
 
  • Regulates digestion & metabolism
  • Impacts our body’s immune system
  • Blocks harmful microbes
  • Extracts & make vitamins &  other nutrients from ingested food
  • Produces anti-microbial chemicals to fight off pathogens
  • Builds & maintains our gut wall to protect us from outside invaders
  • Plays a  CRUCIAL role with brain health  
  •  
So now that we know the “why gut” — where do we go from here? Let’s first consider food and nutritional intake. The reason is because the wrong dietary/foods will impact the integrity of our gut lining and that increases inflammation in the body. This is important because there is a correlation of inflammatory markers with most common diseases like coronary heart disease, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s, autism, diabetes, and cancers. This, my friends, makes our gut bacteria is tres importante! 
 
Knowing which foods contribute to bodily inflammation can be done with a food sensitivity test. Or, you can keep a journal noting what you eat and how you feel afterwards. You can get a pretty darn good indication of offending foods from a food journal.
 
Going one step further with some type of inflammatory testing is a GREAT idea especially if you are on medications for a chronic condition or battling (or have battled) one of the diseases above. There are a couple basic lab tests for inflammation including determining C – reactive protein, TMAO (trimethylamine oxide), or TNF (tumor necrosis factor) levels. Please…find out if you have inflammation and FIX IT! If you think you shouldn’t look at these markers until you are middle age, think again.
 
Don’t wait to test because studies have shown those people with inflammatory levels in their 30’s/40’s have the worst memories 24 years later (and brain shrinkage). David Perlmutter, the author or Grain Brain (newly updated, btw), suggests we fix the roof when the sun is shining. My younger adult friends, this means you. Pregnant women, this means you. My middle aged peers….THIS MEANS YOU.
 
Not motivated yet? There was another study done correlating the size of one’s belly and the risk for dementia. This test spanned 36 years. You guessed it, there was a DIRECT correlation.  Another easy test to help here is to determine oxidation of LDL with a glycated hemoglobin test (or A1C). The higher the A1C, the greater the brain shrinkage (seriously).
 
Please don’t buy into the pharmaceutical companies making money off of Alzheimer’s drugs (which are mostly ineffective and cause people to decline faster) when the natural solution is right in front of us. Yes my friends, we have to be intentional. And yes, we will have to let go of artificial and way-over-sized portioned conveniences of eating out frequently, but isn’t the payoff worth it?  BTW, the SAME efforts to improve brain function and improve gut health will (drum roll) improve your overall health and help you lose unneeded fat.
 
My short list for improving your diet is this:
 
    • Eliminate gluten & processed flour foods
    • Reduce consumption of inflammatory red meat and other inflammatory proteins (btw there are more than a few studies relating to the consumption of red meat and colorectal cancer…) 
    • Eat LESS protein – and when you do, make sure it’s clean (antibiotic /hormone free) like wild fish or some hormone /free range eggs) 
    • Increase diversity of high fiber vegetables
Next, I recommend reading the new Grain Brain book by David Perlmutter or Dave Asprey’s Game Changers for specific recommendations relating to resting insulin, vitamin D levels, hemoglobin A1C levels, fasting blood sugar, the amount of exercise, the amount/quality of sleep, etc.
 
YOU are worth the education and investment of time to learn what’s best for you (and your loved ones). AT the very least, search for podcasts with key words and these authors’ names and learn while you drive. 
 
What have you got to GAIN? (Check my past posts if you’re still not sure!)
 
Until next time. Love yourself. Hug a person or a pet. Get outside. Laugh.
 

Lisa  

P.S. Want some more goodness on this subject?


Are you a little concerned that your good work to date will get derailed this holiday season? Don’t despair, healthy living does not mean total deprivation. It does, however, require a few strategies to keep you on the right track.  Here are a few ways you can limit temptations over the holidays:
  1. Drink up. (Water…that is!) You’d be surprised at the difference dehydration can make. It’s often mistaken for hunger. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
  2. Out of sight, out of mind.  You know how there’s a reason for product placement at the grocery store? Do your own “marketing” at home by removing food or snacks not healthy for your family. Out of sight, out of mind.
  3. Keep a log so you can identify triggers and are realistic about input/output. Most folks overestimate calories burned and underestimate calories consumed. Keep it real.
  4. Know your limit. Can you indulge a little? Or does one bit turn into the entire bag/box? If the latter is the case, then that means no sugar should pass your lips. So be it. Is it difficult to eat out if you see or smell dessert or French fries? If so, skip it for now. Honor thyself. If you CAN indulge a little, go for it. Enjoy it, savor it, and then add some extra workout time. It’s all good.
  5. Good fats help resist the sugar urge. As does protein. Eat up.
  6. Create a bit of crazy. Visualization, that is. If sugar is still tempting you, imagine your sugar free life and the healthy/energetic/lean self you’ll be sporting! SEE it, claim it, then make the choice that aligns with that vision.
  7. Change your habits…or people around you. We talked about this one before. If you eat mindlessly while watching TV, don’t let yourself watch TV unless you are on the elliptical. Or, avoid that “friend” who eats junk food in front of you daily while you nurture your self goals.
  8. Lead the way. Influence your friends and be the change you want to be. Cook healthy, commit to exercise. Healthy habits beget other healthy habits.
  9. Commit publically. With your friends, family, online. Ask to be held accountable. It works!
  10. Take a nap! This is a goal every weekend (for me). It doesn’t always occur, but when it does, it’s soooo sweet! I find I want sugar when I’m tired. Not to mention I get a little bit grumpy when I’m in need of more zzzz’s.
Last, it’s not about being perfect, but choosing to make better decisions, more frequently, and more consistently over time. Becoming healthier is a journey.  And tomorrow always brings a new day.    That’s awesome.  So next time you are faced with that fork in the road, ask yourself, “What have I got to gain?”
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Until next time, choose fit, be strong. And, laugh often.
~Lisa
 
The last time we chatted, we talked about the pros/cons and influences of our environment and the people we hang out with. To help secure success, here are five things to do to make good things happen in your life.
 
1. ADMIT THAT ….” –IT” HAPPENS
Because we are faced with loads of data and information daily, we simply can’t evaluate each & every choice, therefore much that happens is automatic (efficient) behavior patterns and habits. When we are in uncertain environments we tend to “follow the herd”, so the key is to plan ahead, especially when traveling. Scope out the nearest gym or track and pack snacks.  BE the change and you may influence your companions to mimic your healthy behavior.
 
 2. KNOW YOUR TRADEOFFS/ LIMITS
Pay attention to your food intake and avoid mindless eating. Have a set of guidelines that you will follow in all situations so it eventually becomes a habit. (Like, veggies only during happy hour free for alls laden with fake cheese and fried options.) Maybe you have a rule that you will put your fork down between bites. Or, maybe you will only watch TV if doing so on the elliptical or doing exercises during commercials to avoid sitting and being sedentary. This is actually one of my favorite ways to slip in workouts. For normal TV viewers (yes, I am one of those), there’s at least 20 minutes during a 60 minute show. Do you know how many squats, jumping jacks, and crunches you can do? I like to do 30 second circuits repeating exercises until the next commercial, at which time I switch to another circuit of exercises (squats, dips, push-ups, knee outs).
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3. BUILD-A-BUDDY (WORKOUT GROUP, THAT IS)
One of the best ways to protect your fitness routine   is to invite the friends of your friends to work out and build a wall of influence that increases your chance of sticking to a workout program. Shhhhwwwwingggg! 
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4. IF YOU’R HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT
Avoid your Debbie downer friends. (Remember that SNL skit where the girl always put a negative spin on EVERYthing?) Yeah, stay away from those folks and hang with the happy ones. It’s contagious and it works both ways. And smile. It reinforces a positive mood. Practice daily gratitude daily by writing down 3 things you are thankful for, say thanks, and tell your loved ones how  much you appreciate them. Research shows regular gratitude practice creates new neural pathways that support a more positive outlook. WOW, that’s powerful, isn’t it? Even better is that others are more likely to “catch” your positive feelings over your negative ones. Be a P.O.P.V. or a “proliferator of positive vibes”.  It’s seriously catching.
                                                        Happy (Official YouTube Video by Pharrell Williams)
 
5. TAP INTO YOUR NEO-CORTEX
To help you choose the right (healthy) action, try being intentional using body scanning and labeling. Do a quick check-in with sensations and then label your emotional state by noting “this is just fear” or “this feeling is approval seeking” to kick your neo-cortex into action. This practice allows you to shift from being reactive and move to a calmer state of awareness. 
 
Doable, right?  Try my “five” to enhance “alive”.  And commit to fit.
 
What have you got to lose?
 
 

“Pay attention to your intuition. Listen to your heart. Speak your mind. Love yourself so that you can love others. Smile.” ~Nishan Panwar

In parts I & II of the blog series, “Be Your Best You”, we talked about nourishment of the mind with a little down time and last week we talimageked about nourishment of the body through exercise, nutrition, hydration, and sleep. Today’s blog, Part III, is about strengthening the soul through self-love, love of others, spirituality and laughter.

The first ingredient of soul care is self-love. It’s natural to take care of other people/things we love…but to trul y love others we have to love ourselves first. The Golden Rule tells us to “love your neighbor as you love yourself”. Self-love isn’t being arrogant or getting our way, but it does require knowing our boundaries, being kind to ourselves (learning how to say no), and honoring our values. When we live from a place of self-love, the world mirrors compassion and love back to us.

Once we learn to love ourselves, we may offer a better self to those around us. Loving others is ingredient number two. It lowers risks of chronic diseases, stress, and brings emotional happiness. When we do acts of kindness through service, it connects us to those we serve and gives us a kind of satisfaction that self-interest cannot provide.
Ingredient number three is spirituality, or connecting to something bigger than ourselves. Mainstream science has proven that we are wired to believe. So, not only are we built to connect, the more we connect and develop our spiritual selves through meditation, prayer or other means, the healthier and happier we live.

“Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.” ~Victor Borge

The last ingredient to nurturing the soul is laughter. Laughter releases tension and relaxes us. Physiologically, it benefits the body like a light workout by increasing blood flow, boosting energy, burning calories and aiding sleep. In other words, it’s time to get silly. When laughter is shared, it bonds people together increasing intimacy. Best of all, it’s fun and free.

Self-love, loving others, spirituality, and laughter are four key ingredients to strengthen your soul. What’s holding you back from loving yourself in a way that inspires and brings forth beauty? Be patient with the process and allow it to unfold. You will find you are ready to compete again, but stronger and better.

 

Carpe diem!

~Lisa

 

“Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later
have to find time for illness.” ~Edward Stanley

We know our best self requires a strong foundation of mind, body and soul. Sometimes life’s pace throws us off course and before we know it, we aren’t functioning optimally. When performance suffers in athletics, it is recommended to ease up on training, step back and focus on rebuilding and strengthening the core, the body’s foundation. After that, athletes return to the training program at hand, but stronger and better. Last week, we discussed nourishing the mind by slowing down and “taking 5” to reboot our brains. Continuing the dialogue of becoming your best you, today’s topic is nourishment of the physical body through exercise, nutrition, hydration, and sleep.

Exercise: Sitting is the new smoking. What? Yeah, our lives of convenience are taking a toll on our health. The studies are in. Daily movement is tres importante. Activity trackers are great tools to remind us how long our butt’s been in a chair by monitoring steps, workouts, sleep, etc. Find your fit because one size does not fit all. Do what you enjoy most so you’ll keep doing it. Yes, it’s important to get resistance training in. But that can come in different forms, as does cardio and flexibility. The high intensity intervals we suggested in last week’s blog (go hard, take a breather, go hard, rest, etc.) works well with cardio and lifting weights. Try Tabata. Increase your strength, stamina and mind at the same time. So be like Nike and just do it (repeatedly)!

Nutrition: Eat real, whole, fresh foods. Hippocrates was right. Food IS thy medicine. What we eat provides much more than fuel. It affects our immune system, plays a role in hormone regulation, intestinal health, and impacts a myriad of diseases. The most important action item we can do in this arena is to take back control of cooking. You don’t have to be a chef or spend much time in the kitchen. There are many healthy recipe options to choose from. Focus on foods in season, eat local, and look up recipes on Pinterest. Involve the family and eat mindfully. Turn the TV off and don’t be swayed by the high cost of cheap food.

“Water is the only drink for a wise man.” ~Henry David Thoreau

Hydration: Henry knew that water is integral to our health. In fact, more than half a person’s body is made up of water, so even mild dehydration can compromise the efficiency of most bodily functions, including boosting resting metabolism. Don’t wait until you are thirsty. Drink up and reap the benefits of good hydration: lower blood pressure, flushing of toxins, reduction of allergy/asthma symptoms, speedier joint and tissue repair, boosts in mood and energy, and of course weight loss/weight maintenance.

Sleep: Surveys are increasingly noting that most Americans are getting less than 6 hours a night, while 7-9 are better numbers. Like water, sleep deficiency contributes to many health issues like weight gain, high blood pressure, decreased immune function, impaired memory, and higher levels of inflammation which are linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, and premature aging. On the performance side, improving our sleep quality and quantity will increase creativity, work and athletic performance. ‘Nuff said, sleep matters!

The great thing about nourishing our body through the areas above is that WE can reclaim control ourselves. That’s awesome. Optimal living at our fingertips.

Today is a great day to re-commit. Then compete. I’ll see you at the finish line (yawn) after I take a nap!

~Lisa

(blog posted by Compete Every Day)

7 day

“Love yourself first and everything else falls in line. You really have to love yourself to get anything done in this world.” – Lucille Ball

Society seems to prize busyness. Being “on” at all times has become an expectation. Kudos to those who are focused, have a plan, and busy are working it. You possess the necessary ingredients for goal achievement! Being too busy, however, has a cost. Ironically, it negatively impacts the very success we are trying to achieve. If we go down the busy path too long taking care of the kids, the job, the home, relationships, etc., exhaustion creeps in. We wear down our nervous system and dampen our ability to be our most productive self. Racing from point A to point B, we produce and we provide. We are “on” at all the right times. However, the more externally we focus and the larger our “to-do” lists grow, the more inefficient (& unhealthy) we become. It is necessary then, to become our best self, we must slow down and nourish ourselves in mind, body and soul. To be our best self, we need to step back and rebuild our foundation. Today’s topic is nourishment of the mind through downtime. A little bit of nuttin’, honey.

You might think being idle is nuts, a waste of time. But, taking a few minutes of “nothing” can add up to a whole lot of something. It stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system and that, my friends, brings a slew of healthy benefits.

See, when we’re too busy, nothing new can come to mind. Creativity is dampened. Science has proven, however, that if we carve a little “mind space” we reap some cool benefits. Unstructured time allows for a process of incubation which is where our best ideas and solutions can come from. Not convinced to take a time out yet? The Energy Project study found that associates who took “time outs” increased their creative capacity in a huge way and enjoyed a greater level of health and mental well-being. Overwork has the opposite effect; less engagement, feeling worn out, a significant decrease in creativity/problem resolution, making mistakes, and so on.

High intensity intervals (HIIT) isn’t just effective in workouts, it’s an effective work/life strategy. Intense periods of focus should be balanced by time (breaks) allowing for rest and renewal. Short breaks boost digestion, lower the heart rate, increase work capacity, and elevate moods. So, go ahead, take a break. Observe how “energy management” can aid time management. Close the door. Turn off the phone. Or, step outside. Be still for 5-10 minutes a couple times each day. It may take a little getting used to, but the more you do less, the better you will be.

By making ourselves our own wellness mission, we can do better in serving others AND achieving our goals. Nourishing the self is essential to health, happiness and well-being.

Take 5 to renew. Then compete, better. Every day.

Choose fit. Be still. Live strong.7 day

~Lisa Read More →